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Workers Comp in Yakima, WA

If you've been injured on the job, dealing with the Department of Labor and Industries or the self-insured employer can be an intimidating, frustrating experience. You may have questions that are not being answered.

  • Are you receiving all the benefits to which you are entitled?
  • If you are unable to work, are your time loss benefits being paid on time, every time?
  • If your doctor is recommending diagnostic tests or referring you to other specialists, are these requests being authorized?
  • Are you allowed to choose your own doctor, or must you be seen by a doctor chosen by the Department of Labor and Industries or the self-insured employer?
  • Must you return to work before your doctor certifies that you are ready?
  • Are you entitled to time loss benefits if you are only released to light duty work and your employer has no light duty available?
  • Are you entitled to vocational retraining if you cannot return to the job of injury?
  • When your doctor has indicated that treatment is concluded, are you entitled to some "settlement" for a permanent disability?


At Prediletto, Halpin, Scharnikow and Nelson, P.S., we can assist you in answering these questions, and help you to get all the benefits to which you're entitled, including total temporary disability benefits if you are unable to work for a time after your injury; loss of earning power benefits if you are unable to return to the same job at the same rate of pay for a time after your injury; vocational retraining benefits if you are unable to return to any type of work at all after your injury; a "settlement" or permanent partial disability award if your doctors certify that you have suffered some permanent impairment; and total permanent disability or "pension" benefits if your doctors certify that as a result of your industrial injury or occupational disease you are permanently unable to return to any kind of work. 

Some things you should know if you have been injured on the job or 
suffered an occupational disease: 

  • If you've suffered a workplace injury you must file a claim with the Department of Labor and Industries and/or self-insured employer within one year of the date of that injury.
  • If you've suffered an occupational disease, such as asbestosis, carpal tunnel syndrome or other repetitive motion syndromes, occupationally-related hearing loss, or any other medical conditions caused by your employment, you must file a claim within two years of the date that you are informed in writing by a doctor that you have an occupational disease, that you have a right to file a claim, and that you have two years within which to file that claim.
  • Under nearly all circumstances, an order issued by the Department of Labor and Industries or the self-insured employer becomes final and binding sixty days after it is communicated to the injured worker unless a written protest is submitted within that time period. If an order is not protested in writing within that time period it cannot be changed.